Bufton on Books: ‘Futuria Fantasia: Issue #3’ by Various (1940)

FUTURIA FANTASIA: ISSUE #3 by Various Artists [edited by Ray Bradbury]
1940 | self-published | Kindle edition | 26 pages
Science Fiction


BLURB
The third of four issues of a science fiction fanzine produced and edited by a young Ray Bradbury in his late teens, and which would feature some well-known future writers in the SF scene.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
* ‘The Voice of Scariliop’ by H.V.B. [a.k.a. Hannes Bok] (1940)
* ‘Aw G’wan!’ by Henry Hasse (1940)
* ‘The Fight of the Good Ship Clarissa’ by Ron Reynolds [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)
* ‘The Intruder’ by Emil Petaja (1940)
* ‘Asphodel:’ by E.T. Pine [a.k.a. Emil Petaja] (1940)
* ‘Marmok’ by Emil Petaja (1940)
* ‘Hades’ by Guy Amory [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)
* ‘The Best Ways to Get Around’ by Ross Rocklynne (1940)
* ‘The Symphonic Abduction’ by Antony Corvais [a.k.a. Hannes Bok] (1940)
* ‘As I Remember’ by Omega [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)


A non-descript edition of Futuria Fantasia. Aside from Henry Hasse’s op-ed column (which confirms my belief that the previous issue’s opinion piece was a deliberate attempt at trolling), and Ross Rocklynne’s interesting article on the various methods of travel used in science fiction, it has little to recommend it. A pair of tales from Hannes Bok and the poems by Emil Petaja are of some interest, but the magazine as a whole feels as though it is treading water. The only saving grace – fiction-wise – is Petaja’s short story, ‘The Intruder’, which is sinister and chilling on a number of levels. (***)


‘The Voice of Scariliop’ by H.V.B. [a.k.a. Hannes Bok] (1940)
More weird visuals from Bok, as he paints another of his lurid literary landscapes. Better story, but less striking descriptions. (**)

‘Aw G’wan!’ by Henry Hasse (1940)
A spirited rebuttal to Foo E. Onya which I would appreciate more if Hasse wasn’t simply rebuking his own pseudonym. (**)

‘The Fight of the Good Ship Clarissa’ by Ron Reynolds [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)
Perhaps the worst Bradbury story I’ve ever read, filled with nonsense and puns, but entirely lacking in humour and narrative. (*)

‘The Intruder’ by Emil Petaja (1940)
A chilling tale of cosmic horror and the nature of inspiration, well-crafted and apt to haunt you for some time. (***)

‘Asphodel:’ by E.T. Pine [a.k.a. Emil Petaja] (1940)
Not impressed by this poem. Despite his use of some florid imagery, poor scansion takes me out of the reading. (*)

‘Marmok’ by Emil Petaja (1940)
A better effort than the previous poem, with good use of rhythm punching the important notes, and some effective phrasing. (**)

‘Hades’ by Guy Amory [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)
Written to accompany a Hannes Bok drawing, this is a short and snappy depiction of Hell. Neither great nor terrible. (**)

‘The Best Ways to Get Around’ by Ross Rocklynne (1940)
An interesting look at various propulsion systems invented by science fiction authors and just how credible they are. Fascinating stuff. (****)

‘The Symphonic Abduction’ by Antony Corvais [a.k.a. Hannes Bok] (1940)
More structure than the previous Bok stories, with the descriptions erring towards the aural more than the visual. Still weird. (***)

‘As I Remember’ by Omega [a.k.a. Ray Bradbury] (1940)
Some reminiscences of the LA science fiction scene, told with real warmth by Bradbury. A charming snapshot of 30s fandom. (**)


 

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